Job Seeker Services

PA CareerLink® Lancaster County, a proud partner of the American Job Center network, has services available to help ALL job seekers, not just the unemployed, obtain family-sustaining employment.

Learn More Here

Employer Resources

Employers explore workforce and training resources.  Learn More Here

Contact the Employer Services team!

Learn more  about the Employer Services team's programs to support the talent pipeline.

Save the Date!

July Workshops
Free, open to all, and includes evenings

Fall Job Fair - Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Manufacturing Day Events - October 2-6, 2017

14
Mar

Well-Being Index

on Tuesday, 14 March 2017 17:36.

Published in March 2017, the Gallup-Healthways State of American Well-Being series, examines well-being across the nation. With 189 communities ranked based on their Well-Being Index score, the report analyzes how well-being varies by community, as well as who leads and lags across the five elements of well-being—purpose, social, financial, community and physical. 

Lancaster County is in the top 30 (ranked 28th) of America's healthiest and happiest places, according to a new ranking, and it is ranked number one in Pennsylvania. Learn more.

02
Mar

A Workforce Crisis is Looming!

on Thursday, 02 March 2017 18:55.

Central Pennsylvania business experts report that a tsunami of job opportunities is hitting area. To take advantage of the high-paying jobs, job seekers need the necessary skills.  To learn more, read Bruce E. Mowday's article for Business2Business magazine dated March 1, 2017.  

24
Jan

Youth Career Summit

on Tuesday, 24 January 2017 16:12.

The 13th Annual Youth Career Summit was held at the Eden Resort & Suites on Tuesday, January 24, 2017.  This event is sponsored by The Youth Council of Lancaster County Workforce Development Board.  This year's theme was Engaging a Millennial Workforce.

Hope Schmids, Millersville University, was recognized for her contribution to the Youth Council of Lancaster County.

The panel discussion was facilitated by Benjamin Stiles, Ed.D., Lancaster County Career and Technology Center.  The discussion centered on Engaging Tomorrow's Workforce: A Millennial Panel Discussion and included:

  • Grayce Langheine - Organizational Development Manager, Turkey Hill Dairy
  • Danielle Krebs - Marketing Coordinator, Demme Learning
  • Timothy Purcell, Jr. - Staffing Specialist, The Performance Group
  • Mandy Smith - Human Resources Generalist, Tel Hai Retirement Community
  • Hunter Mengel - Student, Millersville University 
07
Dec

17th Annual Workforce Summit

on Wednesday, 07 December 2016 22:18.

Today, the Lancaster County Workforce Development Board held its 17th Annual Workforce Summit at the Eden Resort Inn.   Robert I. Rhoads, Jr., chair of the Workforce Development Board, honored Jill Sebest Welch, Barley Snyder LLC, for outstanding service as immediate past chair of the board.

In addition, the following were recognized as Friends of Workforce:

  • Contribution to the Mission Award to Dr. Gerald Huesken, superintendent of the Conestoga Valley School District;
  • Building Bridges in our Community Award to the Clipper Stadium for its support of work experience programs for youth;
  • Expanding our Horizons Award to the Arconic Foundation for providing funding for identification and short-term training for people facing barriers to employment. 

The keynote speaker was Eileen Cipriani, deputy secretary for workforce development at the Pennsylvania Department of Labor & Industry. Cathy Rychalsky, executive director of the Workforce Development Board, provided an overview of the current state of the Lancaster County workforce. Matthew Sanger and John Robbins of ELANCO presented on the challenges, partnerships, and success of work-based opportunities.

We would like to thank our sponsors and all who participated in this event.  We hope to see you next year at the 18th Annual Lancaster County Workforce Development Board Summit.

18
Nov

PA Chamber Workforce Survey - 11/18/16

on Friday, 18 November 2016 19:42.

76% of the 425+ employers surveyed across Pennsylvania ranked the readiness of the current labor force to meet the needs of employers as fair (50%) or poor (26%).  The biggest frustrations employers have with job seekers:

  • Poor work ethic
  • Lack of motivation
  • Lack of interpersonal skills
  • Lack of interview etiquette
  • Lack of phone etiquette
  • Inability to communicate confidently and maturely

If you need help with job seeking, please contact the Pennsylvania CareerLink of Lancaster County.

Today, employers are looking for:

  • Logical thinking/problem solving
  • Verbal communication skills
  • Reading comprehension
  • Basic math and writing
  • Academic degrees/certifications

The workforce skills needed in the next ten years are:

  • Collaboration and teamwork
  • Verbal/written communication
  • Project management
  • Trades and related skills
  • Presentation skills
  • Business skills

This research was conducted by Susquehanna Polling & Research.

29
Aug

The Silver Tsunami

on Monday, 29 August 2016 20:02.

The baby boomer generation is hitting retirement age, and companies must prepare for what could be a major exodus, or some call it the "silver tsunami."

The US Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that as many as one out of ten workers will retire either this year or the next. It is projected that by the year 2020, about 25% of the U.S. workforce will be composed of older workers (ages 55 and over).

10
Jul

Is a College Degree Still Worth It?

on Thursday, 10 July 2014 11:44.

New York (Associated Press, June 24, 2014):  Some comforting news for recent college graduates facing a tough job market and years of student loan payments: That college degree is still worth it.

Those with bachelor's or associate's degrees earn more money over their lifetime than those who skip college, even after factoring in the cost of higher education, according to a report released Tuesday by The Federal Reserve Bank of New York. The study, by economists Jaison R. Abel and Richard Deitz, also found that a degree is still a good investment for college grads whose jobs don't require college. About a third of all college graduates remain underemployed for most of their careers.

A person with a bachelor's degree can expect to earn about $1.2 million more, from ages 22 to 64, than someone with just a high school diploma, the report said. And someone with an associate's degree will bring in $325,000 more than someone with a high school education. The study used data from the U.S. Census Bureau and the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Rising tuition costs, surging student debt levels and an increase in unemployment rates among new grads since the recession have caused some to question the value of higher education. The New York Fed study is just the latest to say that a degree is a good investment. A Pew Research Center report from earlier this year said young adults with college degrees make more money, have lower rates of unemployment and are less likely to be living in poverty than those with just a high school education.

The New York Fed report said that between 1970 and 2013, those with a four-year bachelor's degree earned an average of about $64,500 per year, while those with a two-year associate's degree earned about $50,000 per year and those with only a high school diploma earned $41,000 per year.

SkillUp

Spotlight - One Good Job

The Mayor's Commission to Combat Poverty

This plan is a blue print and a series of first steps to cut poverty in half in Lancaster County by 2032.  A pathway to success for an entire community requires the development of both workforce and work environment.  Learn more.

Spotlight - Youth Council

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Spotlight - PA Career Guide

This is a valuable resource for students and job seekers alike. The guide is geared to helping individuals prepare for continuing education and/or entering the workforce. Within the guide, the Occupational Data Bank contains employment, wage, and job outlook data for more than 250 occupations.  A brief interest assessment that aligns one’s personality to potential careers is also included to assist those who may be starting a job search or looking to change/advance their career.  

Read the PA Career Guide Here

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